WAYS TO HELP

You can help support this project financially by contributing to our general fund, which will be used to generate genomes for our Phase 1 species, by sharing the word via social media, and by partnering with us in a variety of ways.

 
 
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Current Fundraising Campaigns

In order to complete all phases of the VGP, approximately $600 million dollars is needed, with the expectation that as technology continues to improve, the costs will also decrease. For reference, sequencing the first human genome cost ~1 billion dollars and took 13 years to complete. For the VGP, depending on genome size, which varies from 0.16 Gb to 6 Gb, the cost per species ranges from $2,400 to $73,500, respectively, and each genome will be sequenced in approximately 1-3 months. We are currently focusing on raising funds to complete Phase 1 of the VGP:


IN ORDER TO COMPLETE PHASE 1 (260 species) WE NEED TO RAISE ~$6 MILLION; AS OF SEPTEMBER 2018, WE HAVE RAISED:

 PHASE I FUNDING AS OF MAY 22, 2018

The following are some of the species that we are currently seeking funding for in order to complete Phase 1. All contributed funds will directly support the project.

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TAWNY FROGMOUTH

The tawny frogmouth, Podargus strigoides, are big-headed, stocky birds that are often mistaken for owls. These nocturnal animals are found in Australia and Tasmania and are one of the best examples of cryptic plumage. Their plumage, which is patterned with white, black, and brown streaks and mottles, allows them to become ‘invisible’ in daylight.

NEEDS $18,000

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PANGOLIN

The Chinese pangolin, Manis pentadactyla, is shy and secretive. This slow-moving nocturnal creature curls into a ball when it feels threatened. The pangolin is considered a delicacy in Vietnam and Hong Kong, and these animals are hunted for human consumption. The Chinese pangolin is a critically endangered species.

NEEDS $18,500

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INDIAN GHARIAL

The Indian gharial, Gavialis gangeticus, is known as the fish-eating crocodile and is characterized by extremely long, thin jaws. It is one of the longest of all living crocodiles, up to 20.5 feet in length, and is one of three crocodiles native to India. There are fewer than 235 individuals, thus, this crocodile is listed as critically endangered.

NEEDS $39,500


VGP Fundraising "Wall of Honor"

This Wall of Honor highlights some of our recently funded species towards our current project status. Thank you for financially supporting the VGP. Completed genomes will be available on the Genome Ark.

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LEATHERBACK TURTLE
Fully Funded April 2018

Leatherback sea turtle, Dermochelys coriacea, funded at $41,100: This turtle is also known as the leathery turtle, trunk turtle, or luth and is the largest of all living turtles. It can be differentiated from other turtles by its absence of a bony shell. It is listed as vulnerable on the IUCN Red List.

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MEXICAN SALAMANDER
Fully Funded April 2018

Mexican salamander, Ambystoma mexicanum, funded at $480,000, is critically endangered. This amphibian is also known as axolotl and Mexican walking fish and is unusual in that they reach adulthood without undergoing metamorphosis. The Mexican salamander remains aquatic and gilled instead of developing lungs and taking to land. They are also able to regenerate limbs. Their current conservation status results from urbanization in Mexico City and subsequent water pollution, other invasive species such as tilapia and perch, and being sold as food as a staple in the Aztec diet.

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RING-TAILED LEMUR
Fully Funded May 2018

Ring-tailed lemur, Lemur catta, funded at $52,200. This primate is recognized by its long, black and white ringed tail and is endemic to Madagascar. This highly social species lives in groups of up to 30 and is female dominant. The ring-tailed lemur is classified as endangered.

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GOLDEN MANTELLA
Fully Funded May 2018

Golden mantella, Mantella aurantiaca, funded at $75,000: This small, terrestrial frog is uniformly yellow, orange, or red and is poisonous. The Golden mantella is endemic to Madagascar and is critically endangered, primarily due to over-collection for the pet trade.

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SHARE THIS WEBPAGES ON YOUR SOCIAL MEDIA PAGES

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FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM, TWITTER, AND FACEBOOK

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USE AND SEARCH FOR THE HASHTAGS:

#GENOMEARK, #VGP, #VGL

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FOR SCIENTISTS

We have an open door consortium member policy. Please review the G10K agreement policy that explains how we plan on sharing genome data with VGP members and the public.

 

FOR STUDENTS

If you are student or post-doc and would like to contribute, please contact us.

OTHER IDEAS?

We love ideas! Please contact us directly at contact@genomeark.org.

 

 
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